Lowen-Adler Kaserne

Category Exploration Date Status Country
Military Abandoned Germany

Lowen-Adler
 
The Lowen-Adler Kaserne, or Lion-Eagle Barracks began in 1892 as a military training ground under Emperor Wilhelm II. It was so named because it was technically two separate barracks, the Lion's Barracks for infantry training, and the Eagle's Barracks for artillery and later mechanized training.

During World War I, two, possibly three different POW camps were constructed in close proximity to the west (Wustermark), north (Dyrotz) and east (Doberitz).

Lowen-Adler

With the Olympic Games coming to Berlin in 1936, a suitable location needed to be selected for construction of the Olympic Village. The grounds just north of this base were selected, and afterward, its facilities were integrated into the training base.

After the war, from 1945 until 1992, the Soviet Army continued to use this base for training its own soldiers.

Lowen-Adler

When we arrived, we discovered there were precious few places for people who didn't live there to park their cars. Eventually we found a place, and were faced with a decision. Do we take the tour of the former 1936 Olympic Village, (which had its own parking, I should add) or take a walk to the south side of the highway and see what wasn't on the tour. We opted for the latter, deciding that we'd do the tour afterward if there was time.

The buildings at this facility are like none I had explored to date. The architecture was completely different. Despite their obvious age and state of neglect, most aspects of the buildings were still just as solid as they'd ever been.

Lowen-Adler

With the number of buildings there, we could have stayed countless hours, but the time was getting late, and the clouds on the horizon were beginning to look ominous. We decided to take our leave.

Part way back, the heavens opened up on us. We were completely drenched to the skin by the time we got back to the car. And, for the record, we were too late to join the tour, even if it hadn't been pouring.


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