Murray Mine

Murray Mine
Category Exploration Date Status Province / State Country
Mining , Abandoned Ontario Canada
Submitted by Mike on Sat, 05/31/2008 - 15:15

History: 

Wikipedia indicates that Murray Mine, once a copper and nickel mine, was the first site, responsible for all other mining operations in the Sudbury area. The metals were discovered here in 1883 by Thomas Flanagan, at that time a blacksmith for the CPR.

The mine is named after two of the four original claim holders, Thomas and William Murray. The mine was closed in 1894.

The property was purchased in 1912 by the British American Nickel Corporation who only worked the mine until 1914. The mine was reopened again in 1916, but closed once again in 1921. The mine would open again for another year between 1923 and 1924.

Inco purchased the mine in 1925 and production from this location was steady until its final closure in 1971.


Personal Commentary: 

The concrete buildings you see pictured here were a pleasant surprise. I began walking an old road, no longer in use, and not having encountered any "No Trespassing" signs, decided to see where it led.

After some time, a few turns, etc., I found myself among the remnants of something large. The buildings still standing weren't that impressive, but the concrete pads around them suggested much larger structures once stood.

In the ever-changing landscape of that particular place I spent a few moments examining and enjoying it as the sun began to settle on the horizon.

As I was leaving, a white Dodge Ram pulled up and a female security officer approached us. After exchanging some information, and informing her that I had not encountered any signs, she drove me back out the way I walked in with a heavy degree of skepticism. By her own admission, however, she wasn't even aware this road existed.

When she dropped me off, and after I assisted her in turning her truck around (she wasn't very tall), I continued on my way no worse for wear.

The second visit involved a ventilation fan for the mine underneath. I can't begin to count the number of times I've driven past this place and never noticed it before. Once you know it's there, it's hard to miss, but somehow I was oblivious.

Early one morning I set out specifically to have a look at it. I was taken by size of the intake fan. It looked more like a jet engine. Inside, the air shaft had been bricked over, but someone had made a hole in the brick. When I looked inside, I was unable to really see anything through the darkness, and even the flash from my camera was unable to reveal much.


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