Field Lumber

Category Exploration Date Status Province / State Country
Industrial Abandoned Ontario Canada

History: 

The lumber mill in Field, Ontario was founded in 1914 by Zotique Mageau, and would provide employment for the town and surrounding areas for over 80 years.

On October 9, 1922, the original mill was destroyed by fire but soon rebuilt. The company was sold to Alfred Laberge, a Sudbury businessman in 1941, who in turn sold it to Jack Hope in 1956.

During its peak years, the mill sold top grade white pine to Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Antigua and Trinidad.

The steam plant (shown in my photos) powered a 450 HP generator that provided electricity for most of the operations between 1929 and 1994. Waste wood was fed into the fires to provide almost free energy.

By the 1960's, trucks began hauling the logs instead of floating them down the river.

In 1994, most operations had ceased and from then until July 17, 1998, the company was tied up in bankruptcy until it was destroyed by a massive fire.


Personal Commentary: 

I happened to be driving through Field, which isn't anything new, but turned south instead of proceeding through east / west. It was then that I noticed the crumbled ruins of the steam power plant by the side of the river. Quickly, I did a u-turn and returned to town to find a path in.

When I found the site, it was very apparent that a sizable operation had once been here. I hadn't done any research on it yet, and had only the large sawdust pile to surmise it had been a lumber mill.

Throughout the woods surrounding the ruins of the power plant, there were many foundations of other buildings, many with charred timbers that gave away the final fate of this business.


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