Churches, Etc.

Biscotasing Church

Submitted by Mike on Wed, 10/13/2010 - 15:15

Continuing on with my day trip, I decided to take a look at an almost-ghost-town, Biscotasing. While this town is a mere shadow of what it had been in the past, it still enjoys a busy existence during the summer, and hunting seasons.

St. John's Anglican Church

Submitted by Mike on Tue, 08/17/2010 - 15:15

In 2001, this incredible, old church burned almost to the ground. The committee faced three choices. First, to place a monument on the location of the church and move on. Second, to build a new, more modern church. Third, and most expensively, to build the church as an exact replica of the original. Obviously from the pictures, they chose the third, and most difficult option.

Pioneer Church

Submitted by Mike on Mon, 05/10/2010 - 15:15

History: 

This church was originally non-denominational when it was constructed in 1880. Built on a lot donated by John Foreman, it was to be both a union meeting hall, and place of worship for the farmers and woodsmen in Bear Cave.

Christ the King Church (Sudbury)

Submitted by Mike on Sun, 02/28/2010 - 15:15

History: 

The idea for this church began in 1917, in recognition of the growing number of English-speaking parishioners in Sudbury. However, many construction slow-downs by factors including World War I delayed the laying of the corner stone until June 17, 1928. Construction would continue to be hampered when the right wall blew out in 1928 as the result of a major windstorm.

On September 29, 1929, the church was finally dedicated and blessed by Bishop Scollard.

Rockingham Church

Submitted by Mike on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 15:15

Rockingham Church from the front.

When I arrived, I was immediately taken by the commanding position the church held atop a fairly high hill surrounded by grave markers. As I walked up the hill, I wondered how the town's older worshipers might have made it up.

St. Hubert Mission Church

Submitted by Mike on Sat, 08/01/2009 - 15:15

This little country church is off the beaten path. Though located right in town, you'd be hard pressed to find it unless you were looking for it.

The inside is still in amazing shape, although the pews, and any religious symbols have been removed. Despite whatever period that has elapsed since its last use, it still smells like a church.

German Catholic Orphanage

Submitted by Mike on Sat, 07/12/2008 - 15:15

History: 

The property on which this building stands was purchased for $25,000 as a joint effort of nine parishes. It is alleged that the property was formally a burial ground.

This orphanage was opened June 1, 1875, and administration handled by the Sisters of St. Francis with a starting population of 47 children.