United States

Prairie Lodge Motel and Nearby Garage

With free time from a conference, and a rental car at my disposal, my tour of rural Colorado continued.  The intersection of a small, almost ghost town, just off the highway immediately showed me an interesting little gas station.  It was a call-back to the days when you get your car fixed at most gas stations, and everything was about service.  Days long gone.

Across the road, I spotted a sign that caught my interest... A motel!  Excellent!

Roggen House

This was an unexpected and welcome find along the way. It was as though the UE Gods were attempting to make it up to me that they had thrown a record-breaking blizzard at me to thwart my plans. It wasn't what I'd hoped for, but it was something.

The storm cellar was of particular interest, not to mention the fact that this was the first time I had seen honest-to-goodness tumbleweeds in my whole life...

Byers House

Weather had played against me and deprived me of my primary target. I will, no doubt, be coming back to this state. While driving away, and metaphorically licking my wounds, I spotted this place not far from the road and went for a closer look. With the weather preparing to take another swipe at me, I decided to stop and take a look around.

Manchester Roundhouse

History: 

The Lehigh Valley Railroad (LVRR)  was created originally to transport coal from Pennsylvania in 1846, but it soon began carrying passengers as well.  To help with its growing needs, a large freight yard in Manchester, NY was constructed and opened in 1892 where the company apparently the company loaded and unloaded more than 100 freight cars per day.  The yard was, at the time, was considered the largest in the world, employing over 1000 workers.

Milo Mill

History: 

I am able to find very little history on this site except that a paper mill was built here in 1890 which burned down in 1910. It was subsequently rebuilt. Whether this is the rebuilt mill is uncertain, and the circumstances of its eventual closure are unknown to me. If anyone can point me in a direction for further detail, it would be appreciated.


Personal Commentary: 

Cascade Mill

History: 

In 1825, Meredith Mallory acquired this property but found it difficult to access the water. Access roads were made, and trees cleared until a site was opened for a dam, grist mill and saw mill.

In 1866, a paper mill was built here but burned down in 1869. It was rebuilt and continued operation until 1900 when the property was purchased by Edward R. Taylor.

Conklin Roundhouse

Nothing on the ground is ever as easy as it appears on Google Earth.  This is a rule I keep close in mind, but sometimes my explorations like to make a point of it.

This was such a case, but was incredibly worth it.  The lighting through the autumn leaves and slightly overcast skies was perfect.  As I stepped inside this massive building I was instantly struck by it.  Not something that I felt at the other roundhouse yesterday.  Something very different.  Something I was really digging!