Infrastructure http://urbexobsession.com/category_Infrastructure en Rose Blanche Lighthouse http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_RB_Lighthouse <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rose Blanche Lighthouse</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 01/15/2018 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">Construction of this lighthouse began in July, 1871, as granite was quarried from nearby.  Advice and equipment were supplied by D&amp;T Stevenson, an engineering firm from Scotland.  With a light standing 95 feet above sea level, it could be seen as far away as 13 miles in clear weather.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">From this time until the 1940's, there were six different lighthouse keepers stationed here.  The building was then abandoned and slowly fell into ruin.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Southwest Development Association, and other community groups, came together in 1988 with plans to restore the lighthouse to its former condition.  Work began in 1996, and was finished in 1999.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">A bed and breakfast, gift store, canteen, etc., have all been constructed near the walking path leading to the lighthouse.  The staff are quite friendly and the view is breathtaking.  We stayed at the bed and breakfast for two nights while exploring around the area, and I had even attempted to do some night photography at the lighthouse, but the weather refused to cooperate.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=827&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="hYJaauFcdZVqrCK1-4FPjSrrezFMvDcqzR4b4SnKoAQ"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 15 Jan 2018 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 827 at http://urbexobsession.com Rose Blanche Pumphouse http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_RB_Pumphouse <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rose Blanche Pumphouse</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 01/02/2018 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">Out for a drive, exploring the area along the south coast of Newfoundland, I spotted a rooftop of a small building peeking out from the bushes.  I simply had to stop for a look.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As I pushed through the overgrowth, I was happy to see that, not only was the door open, but that there was some interesting stuff inside to see and show you.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=502&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="WkvxOQtoIgoZ6afbSl-GZooUdlzeOKvHVgFwUaw34KY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 502 at http://urbexobsession.com Little Current Swing Bridge http://urbexobsession.com/LC_Swing_Bridge <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Little Current Swing Bridge</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/12/2016 - 11:00</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">As I drove to the Manitoulin Island community of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northeastern_Manitoulin_and_the_Islands">Little Current, Ontario</a>, luck was something that was foremost on my mind.  First, I knew I was lucky to get this opportunity.  Second, I would be extremely lucky if the forecast rain and potential thunderstorms held off until after I was finished.  Finally, my luck would hit the trifecta if a boat would present itself at just the right time.  If the last two elements came together as the first had, I would be a very happy person.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The swing bridge is the only fixed link between Manitoulin Island and the mainland.  During the summer months, you can take the ferry, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Chi-Cheemaun">Chi-Cheemaun</a> from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tehkummah">South Baymouth</a> to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tobermory,_Ontario">Tobermory</a>.  During the winter months, however, this bridge is critical.</p> <p><img alt="Old view of the bridge nearing completion." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6731ff19-c38c-4bbb-a292-3e1c792414b7" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/rcaldwellhowland4.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algoma_Eastern_Railway">Algoma Eastern Railway</a> began construction of what was originally a rail-only bridge in September, 1912.  By October the following year, trains were beginning to cross it regularly.  In March, 1930, a lease agreement transferred control of the bridge to the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Pacific_Railway">Canadian Pacific Railway</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Beginning on November 28, 1946, the CPR made an agreement with the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ministry_of_Transportation_of_Ontario">Ministry of Transportation</a> to allow vehicle traffic over the bridge, thereby ending the need for the small ferry that was being used to this point.  Before this time, the bridge had been kept open, closing only when required for trains to cross.  With the new agreement, however, the bridge would now be kept mostly closed, with a CPR employee on hand to open it when required by passing boats or ships.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the 1980's, rail service to the island ended and ownership of the bridge went to the MTO.  The rails were eventually lifted.  In 2003, the MTO replaced the 25 HP Fairbanks-Morse gas-powered engine with electric motors and later resurfaced the bridge.  Maintenance continues as necessary, and there is no end in sight for this iconic structure.</p> <p><img alt="View of the underside of the bridge." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="edff0511-2198-419c-a05d-22d4c6a3b9d0" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_7826.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The operator met me on the south end of the bridge and immediately guided me through every possible area.  He explained the operation of each part, patiently answering my questions, and even more patiently allowing me all the time I needed to take my pictures.  We climbed to the control room that straddles the mid-section of the bridge, suspended over the roadway.  He explained the function of the controls, and walked me through the process of stopping vehicle traffic, and opening the bridge for passing marine traffic.  As the clock's hands swept ever closer to the top of the hour, the time when the bridge would open, if required, there were no boats to be seen.  He explained that, after Labour Day, there wasn't nearly the number of openings as during the rest of summer.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I resigned myself to not seeing the whole thing in action.  We descended the stairs and stood on the platform at road-level talking about recent work done to maintain the bridge as vehicles passed us by.  We shook hands and I prepared to part as we both spotted a boat approaching.  Was it high enough to require opening the bridge?  Was actually going to get this lucky?  Sure enough, it stopped and waited patiently for the top of the hour.</p> <p><img alt="View of the bridge from the control room." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dc0a8d8a-8ab5-476b-b5a1-df9b188c355d" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_7900.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">We climbed again to the control room and he explained each step as he did it.  It was fascinating to watch on the video display as each part of the bridge's machinery worked to rotate this mass of steel out of the way for the boat it dwarfed below.  My phone in the window recorded the process in a video recording while I fluttered from window to window, and out onto the landing to photograph various viewpoints, trying in vain to catch everything.  The boat passed with a wave from her captain, and all too soon, the bridge was closing, ending with a gentle thump at the end.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Again, I thanked my host, and made way back to my car, a broad smile on my face as luck had, indeed, been on my side.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nI4pj1F8lkQ?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=32&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="NPPg6_t0NlTb6cpvA1w2gllyEAAh3vAAIo6ljWd6rlg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 12 Sep 2016 15:00:00 +0000 Mike 32 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/LC_Swing_Bridge#comments Chapleau Hydro http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Chapleau_Hydro <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Chapleau Hydro</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/14/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">Since I was in the area on a sunny Saturday afternoon, I thought I would check out the town of Chapleau, Ontario.  I had never been here before and the opportunity presented itself.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Immediately as I was driving in, I spotted this tiny generating station beside the road and decided that I would stop for a look on the way out of town.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The inside was stripped of all equipment and it appeared as though it had been this way for a long time.  Despite that, it was interesting to see and helped me to learn a little more about how these places operated.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=250&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="ARZkbEf93sgFJRvQSjdXAF97nTq80fRbRKYhyE9fM_Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 14 Oct 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 250 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Chapleau_Hydro#comments Chatham Incinerator http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Chatham_Incinerator <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Chatham Incinerator</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 08/25/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">The first stop on my long-weekend trip was to explore an abandoned garbage incinerator in the town of Chatham, Ontario. There was very little reliable information on the history, when it was built, when it was decommissioned, etc., but it appeared to be an interesting enough place to check out.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Buried in dense woods, the two tall stacks betray its location to me as the GPS gets brings me as close as I can drive. I step out into the morning sunshine, already beginning to get warm and I shoulder my pack to find a path I'm sure the locals must have made to this place.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Within a few short steps from the railway tracks, I beat a hasty retreat as I encounter an almost impenetrable wall of ravenous mosquitoes who clearly haven't had a decent meal in weeks.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">A quick dose of Muskol at my truck and I'm back on track.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When I entered the woods along the well-worn path, it was difficult to imagine that this place had been in use at any time in the recent past. As I moved carefully around, the amount of rusted metal laying everywhere kept me mindful of where I placed my feet.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The incinerator itself was a sight to behold... for someone of my interests. But the areas I found behind it, and surrounding it, were an ecologist's nightmare. Rusting drums were everywhere, in some cases surrounded by concrete foundations, in others, left out in the open alone. I have no idea if those drums ever held contents but, if so, they had long since dumped their cargoes, perhaps into the soil below.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">While I am always glad for places such as this to explore, and while I have, of course, wandered places that many might consider to be environmental hazards, this was, in my considered opinion, one of the worst. It's insidious, however, in that it's cloaked in thick, green foliage that makes it appear so benign.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Tread carefully if you visit here.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=252&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="VY3w-XSV0cE6c1mMUWcalGj77A5YnuFYlKFY0sSeFJU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 25 Aug 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 252 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Chatham_Incinerator#comments Tiny Abandoned Airport http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Tiny_Abandoned_Airport <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Tiny Abandoned Airport</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 11/24/2012 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">This airport was built by Transport Canada in 1952, and was allegedly used as an operating base for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Canada_CF-100_Canuck" target="_blank">CF-100</a> interceptors. It's primary runway, 11/29, is 6600 feet in length, and 200 feet wide.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">There is mention that it was abandoned in 1958. Perhaps this was with regard to its military role, prior to its civilian utilization.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">It officially closed in 1982, and no further use could be found for it. Trespassing happened fairly frequently after this, by people landing here, and by people drag racing on the runway. Shortly, the lawyers for Transport Canada advised them to do something about it.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In response, a plan was devised to have the <a href="http://www.opp.ca/" target="_blank">OPP</a> patrol it, and to cut trenches across the runway to keep it from being used. After talks with the local municipalities, and the local First Nation, who had a claim against the property, it was decided to hold off on this move, and allow the parties to attempt to find a viable plan to operate the airport. In 2005, Transport Canada announced the failure of this attempt.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">From March 27 to March 30, 2006, the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Royal_Canadian_Regiment" target="_blank">1RCR Battlegroup</a> underwent Exercise Thundering Bear on this property. The purpose of the exercise was to train troops for Task Force Afghanistan Rotation 3. It involved the establishment, set-up, operation and tear down of a Forward Operating Base, and involved approximately 1500 military personnel and 250 military vehicles.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Despite whatever plans to the contrary, as the photos show, the two remaining buildings are still... remaining. The runway appears to still be in relatively usable condition with the only barrier to use being the huge white or yellow X's painted on the paving.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I have been unable to find any but the most casual reference to the alleged use of this site for interceptors during the 1950's. Perhaps it was built with the intention to use it in times of need that never happened.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">It seemed as though it was a pleasant enough place, however, and I certainly enjoyed looking around.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=348&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="IJCO2a069ZnyCVg6ITUVpfxQ8sp7vcFI1r4cELICx5Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 24 Nov 2012 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 348 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Tiny_Abandoned_Airport#comments Sault Locks http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sault_Locks <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Sault Locks</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 06/07/2011 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Originally, the first lock on this site was built in 1798 by the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwest_Trading_Company" target="_blank">Northwest Trading Company</a>. It was used to facilitate the shipment of goods past the rapids of the St. Mary's River. However, in 1814, U.S. forces attacked and destroyed the lock during the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_1812" target="_blank">War of 1812</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By the 1840's, consideration was being given to rebuilding the locks to once again facilitate shipping. Those ideas dried up when, in 1855, the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soo_Locks" target="_blank">Americans opened a canal</a> on their own side of the river. All shipping traffic passed through this new canal, making a second canal seem like a waste of money.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1870, an incident took place which would once again begin discussion about a purely Canadian canal. The cargo ship Chicora, carrying military supplies west in support of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolseley_Expedition" target="_blank">Red River Expedition</a>, was stopped by American authorities, and not allowed to pass. Chicora had been used as a blockade runner during the American Civil War, and the Americans believed they were not to be trusted. After considerable negotiations, Chicora was allowed to pass, but only if she offloaded her war supplies on the north side of the river before passing through the canal.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Eventually, it was decided that the shipments of wheat from western Canada, and minerals from the Lake Superior area were too important to allow to be at the mercy of American whims, and that a Canadian canal needed to be constructed. Construction began in 1889.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Rock excavated from the site was used to construct the various buildings surrounding the canal including the superintendent's house. Limestone was brought in from the Windsor area and Manitoulin Island. Finally, the canal was completed and officially opened on September 7, 1895. The first ship to pass through was Majestic, a brand-new Canadian passenger steamer.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The canal was full of innovations brought by Canadian engineering. It used vents in the floor of the lock to pump water in and out, thereby reducing the turbulence suffered by the ships. It was, at the time, the world's longest lock. It was also the first to use electric power, which they generated on site using water passing from lake to lake.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The canal also featured an Emergency Swing Dam. This bridge-like structure could, in case of damage to the lock, swing across and deploy a dam of iron plates to cut off uncontrolled flow of water from Superior into Huron. This system was put to the test on June 9, 1909 when the Perry G. Walker, owned by Gilchrist Transportation Co. of Cleveland, Ohio, rammed into the south main gate. The force of the water released by the damaged gate toppled the north gate, throwing the Walker back out, and swept two other ships downstream. One of those two again struck the south gate and ripped it diagonally in two.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Swing Dam was deployed and served its purpose perfectly. Repairs began quickly, and the canal was able to return to service in just 12 days. There were no injuries or loss of life in this incident.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1979, the aging canal was retired from the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Lawrence_Seaway" target="_blank">St. Lawrence Seaway System</a>, and large ships exclusively used the canal on the American side of the river again. Operation of the Canadian canal was handed over to Parks Canada who continued to operate it for smaller vessels.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1987, the canal was closed due to severe wall damage caused by ice. It remained closed until Parks Canada rebuilt it, and reopened it for recreational craft on July 14, 1998.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Emergency Swing Dam is still present, and is now the last of its kind in the world.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">A beautiful day for a walk and a step back in time to an element of Canadian pride. While I had been in and through Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario several times, I never took the time to stop and wander around near the locks. I had some preconceived notions, almost none of which proved to be true.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">While this isn't abandoned, by any stretch, I felt that it was a significant part of history, and deserves a place among anything else this site offers.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=382&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="Y7Cn2RMCJkJaGT-9HC_wFwSc57jh7RXMawsWALi_V_U"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 07 Jun 2011 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 382 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sault_Locks#comments R.L. Hearn Generating Station http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_RL_Hearn <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">R.L. Hearn Generating Station</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 12/06/2010 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_L_Hearn" target="_blank">Richard L. Hearn</a> Generating Station, located in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto" target="_blank">Toronto, Ontario</a>, was officially opened October 26, 1951. It began as a coal-burning plant, heating boilers and using the subsequent steam to turn generating turbines to produce electricity. At its opening, only two, 100-MW units were in operation. By 1953, two more 100 MW units came online. Finally, the station reached its generating peak of 1200 MW on March 22, 1961, with the addition of four 200 MW units with two turbines each.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">At peak production, the plant consumed approximately 440 tons of coal per hour, required 36 million gallons per hour of cooling water from Lake Ontario and employed about 600 people.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Originally, the plant featured 8 relatively small chimneys that removed smoke from the burning coal. These caused a substantial pollution issue for the city of Toronto. By 1971, a single 705-foot tall chimney was completed, at a cost of $9 million. It was one of the tallest structures in Toronto until the 1976 completion of the CN Tower.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Also around this time, the station was converted to using natural gas rather than coal. During this time, the plant used 40 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year, reducing the pollution it generated, but also reducing its efficiency, and increasing its cost to operate. Between 1978 and 1979, five units were taken off line. The last three 200 MW units were returned to burning coal until they too were taken off line in July, 1983.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Over the next couple of decades, the fate of this station has been uncertain. Different passing governments had planned to reopen the plant, but this never happened. Instead, a new plant has been constructed next door and began operation in June, 2008. Sale to Studios of America and <a href="http://www.comwebgroup.com/about.htm" target="_blank">Comweb Group</a>, who planned to build a 300,000 square foot film studio on the site, also stalled and appeared to fail by 2006.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Most tragically, on June 15, 2008, an urban explorer <a href="http://www.thestar.com/News/GTA/article/444869" target="_blank">fell into a coal chute and was badly injured</a>. He died shortly afterwards in hospital.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As of June, 2010, a plan had been revealed considering the construction of a 3-pad arena. It remains to be seen if this will take place.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The first thing that hits you, almost physically, when you enter this building is the sheer size. It's enormous! With its boilers and turbines removed, you can see the full length of this vast building and it's difficult to comprehend the size. It's also loud. Or it least it was the day I was there. The cold wind was blowing in off the lake, and it seemed as though every plate on the substantial roof was vibrating and rattling.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As I slowly made my way through the gloomy expanse, stopping here and there to take pictures, my imagination wandered to what it must have been like at its peak in the '60's. Loud, dirty, hot and filled with people working to keep power flowing to the city behind it. Also, I was constantly aware of the life that had been lost here, a fellow explorer not so different from myself.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">With so much removed, the highlight of the station had to be the control room. Filled with row upon row of switches, dials, and gauges of various sorts. Lines were drawn on the boards to illustrate the flow of power from breaker to breaker. Much of it was incomprehensible to the likes of me who barely understands the working of a conventional light switch, so I couldn't help but be impressed by all of this, old as it was.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Despite the weather, this proved to be an excellent trip, and an excellent close to my 2010 exploration season.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-file-attachments field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">File Attachments</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="http://urbexobsession.com/sites/default/files/2017-11/20170505_Urban_Toronto_ca.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=1828757" title="20170505_Urban_Toronto_ca.pdf">May 5, 2017 - Urban Toronto.ca - New Details Emerge For Transformation of the Port Lands</a></span> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=68&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="q4O0u_R0AqWgqSqgq229GGDDKyUmT7V41pJRNinJJ3A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 06 Dec 2010 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 68 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_RL_Hearn#comments McNutt's Island Lighthouse http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_McNutts_Island_Lighthouse <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">McNutt&#039;s Island Lighthouse</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 09/02/2010 - 15:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-see-also field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">See Also</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/gallery_Fort_McNutt" hreflang="en">Fort McNutt</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">Whether it's how quiet the place is, the wild sheep milling about, or the incredible view, there's something about this spot that just completely captures you the moment you arrive. Standing at the opening of the fence, taking in the entire view of this location, if you're like me, you instantly go shutter happy.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As with <a href="http://urbex.mikeonline.ca/?q=gallery_Fort_McNutt">Fort McNutt</a>, just a stone's throw away, I would like to again thank our generous Ferryman, and our fantastic guide for making this experience possible.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Update:</strong> All buildings on this site except the lighthouse itself have been demolished.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=419&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="CwaDv8BgQjY1SFuyJOsVYnJgpZNB6jk4Xfv-FJ0Cbf0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 02 Sep 2010 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 419 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_McNutts_Island_Lighthouse#comments Teleglobe Canada http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Teleglobe <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Teleglobe Canada</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Thu, 08/12/2010 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Teleglobe traces its origins back to the formation of Canadian Overseas Telecommunications Corporation in 1950. COTC was a Crown Corporation operating as the exclusive provider of telecommunications services to and from Canada, first by VHF radio, later using newer technologies as they became available.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">My best information at this point is that this station was opened in 1966. It became largely obsolete and finally closed in 1995. Today, the property is in private hands, but allegedly for sale for about $250,000.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Although the monster satellite dishes are gone, and with them most of the equipment, this was a fun explore. I even had an opportunity to make some new friends.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/O_Luk0mFNzo?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/132971830?autoplay=1"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=450&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="tO_5tzE_WnYJTnbIaCmOo7d4AVGz9_4ExrDP_POHmTg"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Thu, 12 Aug 2010 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 450 at http://urbexobsession.com http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Teleglobe#comments