A complex of over 60 buildings, Beelitz-Heilstatten began life as a sanatorium in 1898. By World War I, however, it became a military hospital for the Imperial German Army, and would have the dubious distinction of treating a young Adolph Hitler in October and November of 1916 when wounded during the Battle of the Somme.

Still River House

Another place that I've driven past so many times, yet failed to notice. I really should get my eyes checked.

This place just kept giving. Initially, I thought there was just the house with it caved in roof. After that, I spotted another building, and then another, and then more. Lots of exploring fun. I love places like that.

Textiles Belding Corticelli


Belding Smith and Company began business in 1876 and was incorporated in 1877. In 1883, this textile factory was first built, and expanded over the years. By 1920, the company was renamed Belding Corticelli Ltd.

During World War II, the company produced socks for soldiers, parachute rigging, suture thread, and thread for badges and insignias. After the war, they produced elastic bands, cords, ropes, belt fabrics, and laces.

Highway 17 House 4

When I first saw this place, I didn't think it could possibly be abandoned. I mean, c'mon... people live in far worse than this place appeared from the outside. And yet, here it was, empty and beckoning for me to go have a look.

UPDATE October 15, 2011: It appears as though someone has now renovated and moved in. I'm glad this place will get a new lease on life.

Lower Queen Streetcar Station


This was intended to allow TTC streetcars to run the length of Queen Street, but keep them underground, thereby reducing traffic. It was to run from Trinity Park in the west to Carlaw Avenue in the east.

Digging was already being done for the Queen Subway Station on the Yonge line, so it was decided to excavate the intended streetcar station at the same time.

Sudbury Bus Depot

I decided to take a look at where good buses rest, get cleaned and fed, and where bad buses are cannibalized for the others.

These two were located right across from the main garage. There was a surprising amount of activity, but I suppose that's to be expected from a bus line running 7 days a week.

Interestingly, however, either no one took notice of me prowling around these derelicts, or perhaps they did, but just didn't care. In any event, it made for a fun shoot.

German Catholic Orphanage


The property on which this building stands was purchased for $25,000 as a joint effort of nine parishes. It is alleged that the property was formally a burial ground.

This orphanage was opened June 1, 1875, and administration handled by the Sisters of St. Francis with a starting population of 47 children.