Prisons / Jails https://urbexobsession.com/category_Prisons_Jails en Kingston Penitentiary https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Kingston_Penitentiary <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Kingston Penitentiary</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 05/29/2017 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><strong>May 20, 2017</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <p><img alt="Kingston Penn ca. 1901" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1d71eeae-f100-40c8-9fff-8ae96668b85c" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Kingston_Penitentiary_%28c._1901%29_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">We arrived on a bright and sunny May morning, parked and proceeded to the front entrance to begin our tour.  My attention was initially distracted by the person positioned there to check me in and give me instructions before I noticed the sheer magnitude and domination of this entrance.  Of course, that was its design...  Instant intimidation of anyone entering through the massive doors.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Once checked in, we made our way along a few corridors to a holding room where waivers were signed, groups assigned and color-coded wrist-bands affixed.  Anticipation built as we looked at the paintings of clowns and other cartoon figures on the walls, a stark contrast to what was otherwise experienced by an actual inmate.</p> <p><img alt="Clown painted on the wall of the visitor's centre." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="8ab8fd86-13f8-40b2-ab06-191a6c33110b" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8586.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Kingston Penitentiary was constructed in 1833 / 34, and opened June 1, 1835, as the Provincial Penitentiary of the Province of Upper Canada.  Cells measured 26 inches wide, 8 feet deep and were just 6 feet, 7 inches high.  The entire complex was originally surrounded by a 12 foot high wooden fence, but by 1845, towers, stock walls, and the North Gatehouse were constructed.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In that same year, Antoine Beauche was convicted of being part of a pick-pocketing ring, and sentenced to three years at the Penitentiary.  During that time, on 49 separate occasions, he was whipped for infractions such as staring, laughing, whistling, giggling or idling.  He was 8 years old...</p> <p><img alt="Photo of original central building." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="26db67ac-0466-4951-900b-83b3688020ad" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/a046242-v8_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Henry Smith, the first Warden, didn't begin work there until 1848.  He was eventually dismissed, however, because of violent punishments including flogging, darkened cells and locking inmates in upright coffins.  By 1849, there were already calls for the Penitentiary to be closed, including from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Brown_(Canadian_politician)" target="_blank">George Brown</a>, an MP.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">From 1859 to 1861, a domed hub structure was built to connect the cell blocks together.</p> <p><img alt="Charles Dickens." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3b284fb7-dafe-4e3f-a06d-dc1a62dce6ea" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Dickens_Gurney_head%5B1%5D.jpg" /></p> <p>In 1842, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Dickens" target="_blank">Charles Dickens</a> visited the prison, as he had other prisons including <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_ESP" target="_blank">Eastern State Penitentiary</a>, which he deplored.  In contrast, Dickens said,</p> <blockquote> <p>There is an admirable gaol here, well and wisely governed, and excellently regulated, in every respect.  The men were employed as shoemakers, ropemakers, blacksmiths, tailors, capenters and stonecutters; and in building a new prison, which was pretty far advanced towards completion.  The female prisoners were occupied in needlework.</p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="Current view of a cell on display." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="98bd860f-bad5-439d-bfec-26b86a0d95ba" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8634_1%5B1%5D.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">From 1890, all the way through until 1914, the Penitentiary was overhauled.  Cell size was doubled and they included water, electric light and small tables.  In addition, a new block was built to house the female prisoners.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On September 10, 1923, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Ryan" target="_blank">Norman "Red" Ryan</a> and other inmates escaped.  A fire was started in a shed as distraction and smoke-screen while they erected a ladder against the perimeter wall and escaped stealing a nearby car.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The following month, on October 17, Kingston experienced their first major prison riot lasting 6 days.  Guards were taken hostage, and the prison tailor shop was barricaded.  Tear gas was used to regain control of the prison.</p> <p><img alt="Cleaning up after the 1954 riot." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="711dcc4f-dc6b-49f5-afb1-3f948003f6c5" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/1954_riot.jpg.size_.custom.crop_.825x650_0%5B1%5D.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The next major riot took place on August 14, 1954.  It lasted only two hours, involving over 900 prisoners.  It began during a morning baseball game when a guard was attacked.  Fires were set in various buildings, shops and a warehouse.  After an estimated $2 million of damage had been done, the Canadian Army and a unit of the RCMP were called in to support the retaking of the prison.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The third and final major riot took place on April 14, 1971 and lasted for four days.  Two inmates deemed "undesirable" died during the riot, and six guards were held hostage, but later released without harm.  After negotiations, the riot ended after the prisoners grieved the lack of recreational time, lack of work and concerns about the conditions at <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millhaven_Institution" target="_blank">Millhaven</a> prison which had originally been built to replace KP.</p> <p><img alt="Officials touring the damage after the riot." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4c0229d1-415e-46ca-a131-24e5a00e8446" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/kingston_8.jpg.size_.custom.crop_.1086x724_0%5B1%5D.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">An inquiry held after the riot noted aged facilities, overcrowding, shortage of professional staff, confinement of prisoners not actually requiring maximum security and too much time in cells as causing factors.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Additional riots took place in 1975 which led to the creation of the Sub-Committee on the Penitentiary System in Canada.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">An RCMP investigation into the conduct of specific guards was conducted that resulted in the firing of 8 staff members.  Two guards implicated in the investigation took their own lives before the results went public.</p> <p><img alt="A current view of a guard tower seen through a chain-link fence." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2371d256-f04e-4278-9485-85daf48bdb78" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8769%5B1%5D.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1999, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ty_Conn" target="_blank">Ty Conn</a> became the first person to successfully escape since 1958.  He died, whether by accident, or by his own hand, while talking to CBC producer Theresa Burke on the phone, and surrounded by police in Toronto.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On April 19, 2012, Kingston Penitentiary's closure was announced, and the facility was closed officially on September 30 the following year.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>May 30, 2017:</strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">According to the Kingston Whig-Standard (article attached below) the vision for the site of Kingston Penitentiary, and the adjoined waterfront, will be revealed.  It may include such things as Canada's first sailing centre of excellence, a wind research facility, prison museum, condominiums, and possibly a hotel with shops and public space.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>June 10, 2017:</strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">After our initial tour in May, I had sent an email to the St. Lawrence Parks Commission.  In it, I itemized things I felt was good about the tour, but also some things where I felt it fell short.  Soon afterward, I was informed by the Commission that changes had been made to the format of the premium tours, and they invited me to return, as their guest, to review the improvements.  I gratefully accepted.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">They had, indeed, made the improvements required to make the experience truly enjoyable, including smaller groups, more time, etc.  I offer my special thanks the manager for his responsiveness to the comments of visitors and obvious dedication.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-videos field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><p><strong>CBC Fifth Estate:  Kingston Pen Secrets and Lies</strong></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><a href="https://youtu.be/f5oEe8r2fYs" target="_blank"><img alt="Fifth Estate" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="670ecb3e-a39f-4e55-8868-78fed5002933" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/video_Kingston_Secrets_Lies.JPG" /></a></strong></p> <hr /><p><strong>Doc Zone: Tales from Kingston Pen</strong></p> <p> </p> <p><a href="https://youtu.be/3YbFOOD5Nlk" target="_blank"><img alt="The Doc Zone" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="66f86fdf-64eb-4e60-8602-e6735a8644cf" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/video_Doc_Zone_Tales_from_Kingston.JPG" /></a></p> <hr /><p><strong>CBC Archives:  Fires and Rioting Damage Kingston Pen 1954</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2312813716/" target="_blank"><img alt="Kingston Riot" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0ce15f01-3191-4c33-88dd-c93c18b67ac7" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/video_kingston_riot_1954.JPG" /></a></strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep03 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=13&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="KI2V2LcXpDuWgxqoic4wiRBuo5z3uOQKxP28SqoSgC0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 29 May 2017 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 13 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Kingston_Penitentiary#comments Auschwitz II - Birkenau https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Auschwitz_Birkenau <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Auschwitz II - Birkenau</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/28/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-see-also field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">See Also</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/gallery_Auschwitz_I" hreflang="en">Auschwitz I</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>For history, please see <a href="/gallery_Auschwitz_I">Auschwitz I</a>.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=139&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="C1igSETi0BZwOIxL8BMCeq9spjckvKnX7zPhBmSUujY"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 28 Sep 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 139 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Auschwitz_Birkenau#comments Auschwitz I https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Auschwitz_I <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Auschwitz I</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/21/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-see-also field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">See Also</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/gallery_Auschwitz_Birkenau" hreflang="en">Auschwitz II - Birkenau</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">With Germany's quick victory over Poland, there was a division of territory according to an earlier agreement between <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolf_Hitler" target="_blank">Hitler</a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Stalin" target="_blank">Stalin</a>. The eastern portion of Poland would be given to the Soviet Union. There would be a central buffer zone, and the western portion of the country would become part of Germany.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schutzstaffel" target="_blank">SS</a> immediately began looking for a location in which to establish a prison, predominantly for political prisoners. The suggested location featured 22 pre-existing brick barracks buildings on the outskirts of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O%C5%9Bwi%C4%99cim" target="_blank">Oswiecim</a>, that had previously served the Polish Army. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Eisfeld" target="_blank">Walter Eisfeld</a>, former commandant of <a href="http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sachsenhausen" target="_blank">Sachsenhausen</a>, was sent to inspect the site, and in April, 1940, formal approval was given by <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Himmler" target="_blank">Himmler</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_H%C3%B6ss" target="_blank">Rudolf Hoss</a> was appointed commandant and was sent to oversee development of the new facility. Approximately 17,000 local residents were displaced, some to make room for further expansion plans, and other to make room for German citizens enticed to move to the area.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In May, 1940, 30 prisoners from Sachsenhausen were sent to Auschwitz to become functionaries. By June 14, 1940, the prison was ready to accept 728 Polish political prisoners from a prison in Tarnow.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By its peak in the summer of 1944, the entire Auschwitz complex would cover 40 square kilometres and imprison almost 135,000 people, accounting for about 25% of all people in the entire camp system.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Because of it's vast size, Auschwitz was split into three, largely autonomous camps, Auschwitz I (main camp), Auschwitz II (Birkenau) and Auschwitz III (Monowitz).</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In November, 1944, with the approach of the Soviet Red Army, Himmler ordered the evacuation of the prisons directing that not one prisoner would make it alive into the hands of the enemy. As a result, all who were able were subjected to a death march to the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergen-Belsen_concentration_camp" target="_blank">Bergen-Belsen</a> concentration camp.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When the Russians entered the camp, they found about 600 corpses, and about 7,500 living who had been left behind as too sick to make the trip. Also found were 370,000 men's suits, 837,000 women's garments, and 7.7 tonnes of human hair.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Auschwitz I became a hospital for liberated prisoners. Polish and Soviet investigators worked here to document SS war crimes. Other parts of the facility were used as a Soviet prison camp, repeating many of the atrocities committed by the SS.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Most of the former staff were tried and executed for war crimes, including the commandant, Rudolf Hoss who was eventually hanged at Auschwitz.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=136&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="SuBO65a9dQsjM7JKnR4HmJLDlwd4Ti7nmycuNb-HSiU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 21 Sep 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 136 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Auschwitz_I#comments Ravensbruck Concentration Camp https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Ravensbruck <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Ravensbruck Concentration Camp</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/24/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Officers saluting at front gate." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0d6b57e1-9fe7-473d-ad36-e967a95831f8" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/ravensbruck4.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In November, 1938, approximately 500 male prisoners were sent from the <a href="http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sachsenhausen" target="_blank">Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp</a> to begin construction of Ravensbruck. Unlike other concentration camps being constructed, Ravensbruck was intended specifically for female prisoners.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The camp opened on May 15, 1939, with the transfer of 867 women from other camps. At the start, conditions were not bad. There were beds, with bed linen which was changed regularly. Clean uniforms were issued. Food was in adequate portions and quality. A Communist prisoner, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margarete_Buber-Neumann" target="_blank">Mararete Buber-Neumann</a>, was brought to Ravensbruck after being in a Soviet <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulag" target="_blank">Gulag</a>. She compared the experience as follows:</p> <p><img alt="Female prisoners at Ravensbruck." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1fc16bff-fc47-4fac-85e2-b9bc469a0c87" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/maxresdefault.jpg" /></p> <blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify"><i>I looked across the great square, and could not believe my eyes. It was surrounded by manicured lawns, covered by flower beds on which bloomed bright red flowers. A wide Street, which led to a large open area, was flanked by two rows of wooden barracks, on both sides stood rows of young trees and along the roadside ran straight flower beds as far as the eye could see. The square and the streets seemed freshly raked. To the left towards the watchtower, I saw a white wooden barrack and beside it a large cage, the size of a birdhouse the like you see at a zoo. Within it paraded peacocks (stolzierten) and on a climbing tree dangled monkeys and a parrot which always screamed the same word, "Mama". I wondered, "this is a concentration camp"?</i></p> </blockquote> <p><img alt="Closed section of the camp." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="59b68cee-0a76-4787-8a6e-87c2d6a5cd96" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5131.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the following year, however, conditions began to deteriorate quickly as more and more prisoners were brought to the camps. During the following year, there were over 5,000 prisoners of which 47 died. By 1945, there were well over 10,000 prisoners, and they were dying at a rate of up to 80 per day.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The camp served additional functions as well. First, it was a training facility for over 4,000 female guards, 150 of whom were served at Ravensbruck at any time. They treated the prisoners brutally, many of them then being transferred on to other camps throughout the occupied lands.</p> <p><img alt="Cremation oven." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="20503d4a-2711-4cbf-9786-b27a1bbf0c35" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5137.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In addition, the camp provided labor. The adjacent Siemens factory was producing rocket parts for the <a href="http://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Peenemunde_Museum" target="_blank">V-2</a> program. In addition, a factory was constructed for fixing leather goods and textiles. Other shops produced uniforms for prisoners, the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schutzstaffel" target="_blank">SS</a> and the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wehrmacht" target="_blank">Wehrmacht</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">During the entire operation of the camp by the Germans, over 130,000 women would come through these gates. Of these, only 15,000 would survive to see liberation.</p> <p><img alt="Path toward the back of the camp." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0e4c0fa9-eaa0-4f16-82c1-de85418b25dc" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5141.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">This was now the second concentration camp we had visited. Like Sachsenhausen, there was no cost to go in.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When we arrived, the wind had come up and it was cold. It was later in the day and the museum would be closing soon, although I saw no physical barriers that would keep people out, or in, once they were closed.</p> <p><img alt="SS Residence" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="46a0c1be-31ae-4240-a0ff-f8e584ec04f1" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5142.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Most of the buildings in the main section are gone. All that remains are indentations in the heavy gravel that denote the placement of each of the barracks buildings. The workshops and some other buildings were, however, still in tact.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">A fence separated us from over half of the camp. I learned that this was where most of the camp's industry took place, including the location of the Siemen's factory. We were quite disappointed that no access was permitted to that side, but we continued on exploring a tragic, but fascinating piece of world history.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=156&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="MItecIEYIpptUKbsM0VP6m4uyqyyGfVZhlxYOCn3ZTA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 24 Aug 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 156 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Ravensbruck#comments Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sachsenhausen <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/10/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><img alt="Front gate of the prison." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="59af3311-80e6-4840-87d4-8bb0aa777c5b" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5018.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">One who follows history cannot possibly go to Germany without setting aside the time to visit at least one of the former Nazi camps. During our trip, we visited two in Germany, and two in Poland. This was the first we visited, which was fitting because it was, in fact, the first in the system of camps, and was intended to be the model by which the subsequent camps were to be made and operated.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We drove from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin" target="_blank">Berlin</a> to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oranienburg" target="_blank">Oranienburg</a>, the headquarters of the camp system, and location of KL Sachsenhausen. It was a sunny day, and as we parked, we noted there were a number of tourists, but not nearly as many as we'd anticipated. Admittedly, Sachsenhausen doesn't seem to be as famous as Dachau, or Auschwitz, at least in North America. Perhaps that was why.</p> <p><img alt="Arbeit Macht Frei." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3392a239-846d-4f73-8c04-def32f28816e" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_5021.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">As we approached the gates we saw the infamous slogan, "Arbeit Macht Frei", or "Work Sets You Free". Most people know this as the slogan on the arch over the entrance to <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Auschwitz_I">Auschwitz I</a>, but it started here first, like so much else. Many people stopped and took pictures here. Some posed beside it like a scavenger hunt item. I couldn't help but wonder if the dark humour of this was lost on them. Few were freed from here, or the other camps that donned those words. As the prisoners would say, the only freedom to be had was up through the chimney.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We proceeded through the gates and took in the open area around us. It seemed large. It seemed quite spacious, in fact. It wasn't until later that I would realize that many more buildings had originally been here in those days, and of course, many more people. Standing here today, if you let yourself, you will feel the contrasts between what you see, and what you know. It was crowded. It smelled of burning bodies. The sound of moaning, and screaming could be heard from the inmates who suffered through their incarceration and last days on Earth. It bore little actual resemblance to the open, green, park-like place we saw before us now. So sanitary, and unoffensive.</p> <p><img alt="Roll call." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6829dc55-5ca8-4b01-9856-aee4aa68bd12" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/rollcallatsachensenhausen.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">We toured the prison and read the signs. We learned of the abuse and sometimes murder of prisoners in the bathrooms of the barracks. We learned that, because the prison was inside the borders of Germany, each prisoner who died had to be autopsied and an official cause of death listed that was rarely accurate. We learned how executions were carried out in the gas chambers, by firing squads, or sometimes, even by the doctors in the hospital wards. We found out that most of the earliest prisoners here weren't Jews, as one might expect, but rather Communists and various other more political type prisoners. Those who opposed, or were likely to oppose the Nazi regime as it swept to power.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Months later, I would read the memoirs of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_H%C3%B6ss" target="_blank">Rudolf Höss</a> who was most famous as the first and longest-serving commandant of Auschwitz. He too got his start at Sachsenhausen. He explained the mentality of the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schutzstaffel" target="_blank">Schutzstaffel (SS)</a>, as he understood it from within. He said that they were trained to believe that they were all that stood between Germany and those who wished to destroy it. The people they imprisoned, those they tortured, worked to death and eventually killed, were enemies of the state. They were people who would destroy the Utopia that Hitler was trying to create. It is this belief that fueled the fires of their zeal and removed any mercy they might have shown.</p> <p><img alt="Officers assembled." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ce9733da-635d-4448-9b0a-daaee65063f8" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/bundesarchiv_bild_183786120010%2C_kz_sachsenhausen%2C_ssunterfhrer_beim_zhlappell.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Irony will tinge the visit of the more-than-casual observer. The museum and memorial that this prison became was first created and opened by the Soviets who occupied all of Eastern Europe, including half of Germany, after the war. As a result, the memorial focuses heavily on the death of Communists at the hands of Fascists of the Nazi regime. Where irony plays its role is in the fact that the Soviets, shortly after liberating this camp, proceeded to use it for the very same purpose as part of its Gulag system. German prisoners of war, political prisoners, and many who opposed the continued Soviet occupation were kept here, and died here.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">There are no clean hands in a place like this.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JN90py9Cuco?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep03 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=159&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="VZw1Au5SfFxLyUzptDsMoK7ndC9dJDnVZiK_UsMEkT0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 10 Aug 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 159 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sachsenhausen#comments Project Turnaround https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Project_Turnaround <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Project Turnaround</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 05/11/2011 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1995, The Government of Ontario under the Conservative Party, created a task force to look into "strict discipline", also sometimes referred to as "boot camp" for young offenders. After research, consultations, and visits to other similar institutions, the task force recommended a pilot project that, if successful, could be expanded.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Sally Walker, then the program director for a maximum-security facility for adolescents in Florida, heard about the project in late 1996. Being originally from Ontario, and having contacts there, she contacted Brad DeLong, a social worker in Ottawa. Together, they built a business plan, and by February, 1997, had created the Encourage Youth corporation.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Bidding against five competitors, they managed to win the contract valued at $2.34 million per year. Walker appointed herself "Colonel", and DeLong was appointed "Lieutenant-colonel", and together they set out to, in her words, build a better mousetrap.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In July, 1997, Project Turnaround opened as Ontario's first privately operated strict discipline facility. Very soon afterward, two of its inmates escaped but were soon recaptured in a nearby field. They, and several others, were transferred back to mainstream jails.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Operating with a staff ranging from 40 to slightly over 50, and with a capacity of 32 young offenders, questions began to surface regarding the cost per inmate, and many were anxious to determine whether this style of correction showed any better results than the existing system. With renovations required, the facility only running at half capacity, and having been closed once for mold, the Project's future looked to be in trouble. By the end of 2003, the Government of Ontario, now under Liberal leadership, had decided not to renew the contract that expired on January 31, 2004.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Upon completion of the project, and closure of the troubled facility, there was no conclusive evidence that "strict discipline" made any kind of difference. Also, there was no clear determination as to the efficiency of the system, as both political parties are spinning it in their own favour.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I've visited a few different examples of the penal system, and despite how different this place was supposed to be, it doesn't, on the surface at least, look much different from any other. The high, inward curved fencing is a standard, as are the small, single cells with hard-looking beds and cramped quarters.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">While it was quite similar, I found it to be quite different in other ways, including its size, its history, and the over all sense of failure that seems to hang over it all.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-file-attachments field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">File Attachments</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/sites/default/files/2017-12/20110430_Turnaround_CSC_0_0.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=176585" title="20110430_Turnaround_CSC_0_0.pdf">Correctional Services Canada - Overview of the Project</a></span> </div> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/sites/default/files/2017-12/20110430_Turnaround_Toronto_Life_0_0.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=504789" title="20110430_Turnaround_Toronto_Life_0_0.pdf">A Toronto Life article dated January, 1999.</a></span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-mOrDKIWukA?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep03 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title">Comment</h2> <a id="comment-200"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/200" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/200#comment-200" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Who owns this?</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John (not verified)</span> on Tue, 03/13/2018 - 10:08</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-03-13T14:08:39+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1521061576"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Hey, any idea who actually owns this property?</p> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=200&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="xYDlpB1S8Q_C1116pRJf4hUGujkny8cJj06Qmgv5j18"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <div class="indented"><a id="comment-202"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="1" about="/comment/202" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/202#comment-202" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Who Owns This?</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span> on Wed, 03/14/2018 - 17:06</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-03-14T21:06:50+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1521061610"></span> <p class="parent visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/200#comment-200" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Who owns this?</a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">John (not verified)</span></p> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Probably still belongs to the Province of Ontario.</p></div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=202&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="6mbFiTjz-sZVyhL53s_W-WsKpQtw-IYAdRjMrnHhPE4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> </div><a id="comment-208"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/208" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/208#comment-208" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Previous resident</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Kyle parent (not verified)</span> on Mon, 03/19/2018 - 12:06</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-03-19T16:06:57+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1521509047"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>As for the efficiency of the project turnaround my personal experience here was a life savior, here i got healthy routine and adapted from being all for myself to mentoring two other inmates,there where two adopted dogs Libby and Harley which i had the honor of feeding and helped me build confidence in my living as well as my role in society!</p> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=208&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="kY1y_tUKpXlwx15DOuF2r3z1ZBfMJr5mfXryZa_8RUc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=402&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="-ungPJett_2A6UWecX6Oc9hMCaLany4DlmswEB4kdEs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 11 May 2011 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 402 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Project_Turnaround#comments Old Don Jail https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Old_Don_Jail <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Old Don Jail</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/07/2009 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Don Jail was designed by architect <a alt="Read More" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Thomas_(architect)" target="_blank">William Thomas</a> in 1852. The city purchased 117 acres of land outside of city limits in 1856, and construction began in October of 1859.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Construction was almost complete when, in 1862, a fire almost completely destroyed the structure. Construction recommenced once again, and by 1864, the jail was finally completed and became occupied.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When it was constructed, the Don Jail was the very model of the excellent treatment of prisoners. It allowed for direct sunlight to enter the 276 cells, and featured heat and ventilation.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Despite that, things for the prisoners were not easy. During the appropriate seasons, they worked the fields that then surrounded the jail. The rest of the time, they spent 23 hours per day in their cells. During the one hour exercise time, they were not allowed to speak, and not allowed to stop or sit down. In fact, prisoners were never allowed to speak unless addressed directly by a prison official. The breaking of the prison's rules could result in discipline by flogging.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The cells the prisoners lived in were only 3 feet wide and 8 feet deep. They did not have toilets, but rather had buckets there emptied daily. Visits by family or friends were limited to once per month. Prisoners were also expected to handle most of the routine maintenance of the jail including painting, carpentry ,etc.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On occasion, hangings were conducted at the jail. Originally, they were public and held outside. In 1869, however, Canada outlawed public hanging, and they were moved indoors. Most accounts hold that a washroom was converted into a hanging gallows, but it appears that in fact it was a stairwell.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In total, the Don Jail saw 34 hangings. Thirty were hung for murder, while the other 4 were hung for rape.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Canada's last execution was held at the Don Jail in 1962. This was the double-execution of <a alt="Read More" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Lucas" target="_blank">Arthur Lucas</a>, 54, and <a alt="Read More" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronald_Turpin" target="_blank">Ronald Turpin</a>, 29.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Turpin robbed a restaurant for the total of $632.84. He got away clean until an Ontario PP officer pulled over his vehicle for a broken taillight. Turpin shot and killed the officer, and stole his cruiser. He was captured soon afterward.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Lucas was an American who came into Canada from Detroit to murder a man and his girlfriend who were to testify in a drug-related trial. He returned to the United States after the double murder, but was arrested and extradited back to Canada for trial.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Lucas was allegedly informed that he would likely be the last executed in Canada to which he replied, "Some consolation."</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The double hanging was conducted on December 11, 1962 while protests went on outside.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1977, the jail was closed for overcrowding, and used solely for administration purposes while the new jail, adjacent to the original building, is used to this day.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Because of deplorable conditions in that jail, a new one is being constructed in Mimico. Upon completion, the rest of the Don Jail will be closed and the newer section demolished.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Bridgepoint Health currently owns the Old Don Jail, and will soon be renovating it into office space.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">We arrived at the jail at 4:30 PM, 30 minutes early for our appointment and having driven four hours just for this opportunity. We waited anxiously, even more so as we learned that we would likely be the last public group to see this historic location before it is renovated into office space.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When at last we were let loose inside, we were not disappointed. The moment we entered the rotunda, we couldn't help but be overwhelmed. The high ceiling, and small windows surrounding its peak. The railings and balconies surrounding the room above. The intricacy of the wrought iron serpents that adorned the underside of the walkways.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As we entered one of the cell blocks, we instantly recognized that this was unlike any of the three other prisons we had visited before. The cells were smaller, more claustrophobic. Executions had been carried out here. Standing on the upper level of the gallows room and seeing the outlines in the paint where the heavy support timbers had once been. Looking down to the level below where the condemned men dropped. You can almost smell the fear oozing from the walls.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">While we spent only one hour here, it was sufficient to give us a glimpse firsthand into what life might have been like here. While certainly, one who was not there can never know completely what it was like, this one small look was enough to show us it could not have been pleasant.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-file-attachments field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">File Attachments</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/sites/default/files/2018-01/The_Star_20070927.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=296945" title="The_Star_20070927.pdf">September 27, 2007 - The Star Article - Three Bodies Found Under Old Don Jail</a></span> </div> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/sites/default/files/2018-01/National_Post_20090612.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=362430" title="National_Post_20090612.pdf">June 12, 2009 - National Post - 15 Dead Men Tell Their Tale</a></span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-videos field--type-text-long field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><hr /><p><b>CBC Archives: 1962: Canada's Last Executions</b><br /><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="" src="//www.cbc.ca/i/caffeine/syndicate/?mediaId=1402783239" width="757"></iframe></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep03 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=631&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="qBoTLRM0RQXd6Fv-dqcclgI2It3RCIdT5LWkn506WT4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 07 Sep 2009 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 631 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Old_Don_Jail#comments Millbrook Correctional Centre https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Millbrook <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Millbrook Correctional Centre</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sat, 04/11/2009 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Opened in 1957, Millbrook Correctional Centre became the Ontario Government's only maximum security facility. It would also see a significant amount of trouble during its 46 years of service.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On April 18, 2000, a Vietnamese immigration prisoner died in custody under what was called suspicious circumstances after allegedly being beaten by guards. This incident would then spark a hunger strike.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">An <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontario_Public_Service_Employees_Union" target="_blank">OPSEU</a> news letter dated October 19, 2001 reveals that the guards staged a work refusal because management of the prison withheld information about an impending plan for prisoners to take over the prison. When the prison management finally agreed to a search of the entire institution, several weapons were found in the building itself, and at least 15 shanks hidden in the main yard.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On April 1, 2002, prisoners broke into the control room for their wing and unlocked the other cells, allowing between 25 and 40 inmates out. They attempted to reach the outer yard, but after several hours without success, they returned peacefully to their cells.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In May, 2003, the prison was closed as part of the Ontario government's Infrastructure Renewal Program. Since then it has remained mostly inactive with the exception of filming a movie entitled Of Murder and Memory in the fall of 2007.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">This, I have to say, was one my more interesting explorations. I was there for a considerable time, and it seemed there was something even more interesting to see around each corner.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The entire thing was made sweeter by the fact that it was a limited-time opportunity, with the building being sealed up shortly after my visit.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title">Comment</h2> <a id="comment-6"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/6" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/6#comment-6" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Hi There</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">garry (not verified)</span> on Wed, 10/12/2016 - 20:04</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2016-10-13T00:04:00+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1511749314"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>was there 83-84 hard time the real deal was the youngest guy there stayed in gen pop till released</p></div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=6&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="YOvOPkYyezkDei4jbX-Y_dXXcbCdlvz95pDfUiTx6R8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <a id="comment-7"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/7" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/7#comment-7" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">What Range ??</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mark (not verified)</span> on Sun, 11/19/2017 - 19:30</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2017-11-20T00:30:00+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1511749385"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>I was there then and I was 17. Do any of you remember EVER getting paid for working in the marker plant ?? I never saw a dime !!</p></div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=7&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="gSITky6KmlYh8k3gzKegeQw5Ab0eMLcMkqN0j1ewtsc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <div class="indented"><a id="comment-197"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/197" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/197#comment-197" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">millbrook</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">garry (not verified)</span> on Sat, 03/03/2018 - 11:12</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2018-03-03T16:12:53+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1520138392"></span> <p class="parent visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/7#comment-7" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">What Range ??</a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mark (not verified)</span></p> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>i worked the jobbing shop, weldin bars for other jails mainly, never saw a dime, nor did anyone else i knew, i was lucky n did my last 4 months in the annex camp, was sent there from kenora, and ya the food was better then average, easy time if u were quiet,</p> </div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=197&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="aS8R07538PefB-4MtRQjiik80JEh-7qLK42wj31bPxU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> </div><a id="comment-8"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/8" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/8#comment-8" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Great Pics</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Joe (not verified)</span> on Sun, 01/29/2017 - 13:18</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2017-01-29T18:18:00+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1511749461"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>...brings back memories..I was general population early 90s. No pics of the license plate shop? Remember some hard core full contact ball hockey in the yard. Real shit hole...litteraly! Sewage lines backing up due to frozen lines and raw Sewage flowing through the range.</p></div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=8&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="roEwVhPI8x3guUlKO4gZlMfjatgWmh9ZcaE9ZvBUEwo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=77&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="IWqF-nv2-y6a2K08oTZ342P8WSrFa9_uImYMrtoYAU4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sat, 11 Apr 2009 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 77 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Millbrook#comments Eastern State Penitentiary https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_ESP <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Eastern State Penitentiary</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 07/21/2008 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">The history of Eastern State Penitentiary is a fascinating story spanning many years. As a model for prisons yet to be built, it would stand as first a shining beacon, and then as a potential embarrassment both admired and reviled.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The story begins in 1821 when the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Prison_Society" target="_blank">Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons</a> was finally successful in lobbying the Pennsylvania Legislature for the construction of a new prison. The original plans were for a facility that would hold 250 inmates. Architects submitted designs, but it was <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Haviland" target="_blank">John Haviland</a> who won the $100 prize for his design. Construction began in 1822.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Eastern State as it once looked." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bda8c734-b312-443f-ac7f-223298fb9043" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/bh01_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In April of 1829, with the prison still under construction, plans were completed for what became known as the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separate_system" target="_blank">Pennsylvania System</a>. This was a system of solitary confinement that many believed would create an air of reflection and penitence required to set a prisoner straight. This plan would go so far as to include masks to keep inmates from communicating during the rare times they were out of their cells. The cells themselves each included a feeding slot in the door, and a private exercise yard to reduce communication between prisoners, guards, and each other.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In October of 1829, Eastern State received its first prisoner, Charles Williams, described as “light black skin, five feet, seven inches tall, scar on nose, scar on thigh, broad mouth, black eyes, farmer by trade, can read.” Mr. Williams was convicted of burglary that included one $20 watch, one $3 gold seal, and one gold key. He was sentenced to two years confinement with labour.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Original cell." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3bc8d830-efe7-4955-b9d5-01c5192dfa0a" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_6420_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Things started off slowly for the prison. It is noted by Charles S. Coxe, President of the Board of Inspectors in the first annual report that, by the end of December, 1829, only 9 prisoners had been received. It becomes apparent that perhaps some Judges disagreed with the new system of imprisonment. Further into that same report, Coxe states:</p> <blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify">The extraordinary fact that but nine convicts have been sent from the counties composing the Eastern District, containing so large a majority of of this populous state, demands and deserves great consideration, from all interested in our penal code;</p> </blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1830, however, things begin to pick up as 49 prisoners were sent to Eastern State. In that year, a document entitled A View and Description of the Eastern Penitentiary of Pennsylvania, in which an insight is given into a prisoner's experience there.</p> <blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify">The convict, on his entrance, after the customary examination, ablution, medical inspection, &amp;c., is clothed, blindfolded and conducted to his cell, where he remains locked up; and after a patient and careful inquiry into his history, and the delivery of an appropriate address to him on the consequences of his crime, and the design to be effected by his punishment, he is abandoned to that salutary anguish and remorse which his reflections in solitude must inevitably produce.</p> </blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Original cell." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0209d338-50a5-4fd7-b5b5-d7d1e21b2462" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_6421_1.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1831, construction was completed on Block 3, and due to an ever-increasing volume of prisoners, construction began on the two-story Blocks 4, 5, 6 and 7. In this same year, Eastern State received its first female inmate.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">1832 saw the prison’s first escape. The warden’s waiter lowered himself from the roof of the front building. He was captured, but repeated his escape in the same manner in 1837.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">1834 brought with it the first investigation into the practices being used within the confines of the prison. This investigation was started amid allegations of abuse and general deviations from the Pennsylvania System of Confinement.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Construction of the original prison was finally completed in 1836, seven years later. The prison had grown to a capacity of 450 prisoners, and boasted sophisticated indoor plumbing and sewage facilities. This has not, however, been cheap. The final cost of construction came in at $750,000, making it one of the most expensive buildings of the day.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Old corridor." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="1b1239ed-f967-48b1-99ce-8280667ba5a0" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_6441_1.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the years between 1877 and 1894, four new cell blocks were added to handle yet more prisoners. These blocks, however, would not include the private exercise yards featured in the earlier construction.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">A three-story cell block, Block 12, was added in 1911, adding an additional 120 cells to the prison’s substantial population.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In July, 1923, Leo Callahan, and five other prisoners, scaled the east wall of the prison. Despite recapturing the accomplices from places as far away as Hawaii, Callahan himself was never recaptured.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the Annual Report of the Warden, in 1924, he states:</p> <blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify">The Eastern State Penitentiary, built 100 years ago on the Warner Farm, located according to the records of those days as being "Near Philadelphia" has out-lived its usefulness as a penal Institution. The buildings are antiquated, insufficient in size and not well adapted for the housing of prisoners. The plot of 12 acres occupied by the Institution, located now almost in the heart of the City, is entirely too small for the necessary buildings, shops and recreation grounds…</p> </blockquote> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1926, with the addition of Block 14, Eastern State held a population of 1,700 prisoners. This is substantially larger than the 250 prisoners originally intended for the facility. It is apparent that the state did not agree with the Warden’s views.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Recreation of Al Capone's cell." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b6a66e56-3f64-44e2-b333-b7c155c3ac71" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_6529_1.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">For eight months between 1929 and 1930, this population would include a celebrity, of sorts; Al Capone.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">1933 brought a riot protesting living conditions, lack of recreational facilities, and general boredom. Another riot in 1934 complained of low wages. These were nothing, however, compared to the 1961 riot that required the guards and a large contingent of smurfs to retake the prison by force. This riot began discussions about the eventual closure of the prison.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Protests against the conditions of the prison." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ce1c6f30-f91f-4ee9-8261-c22e3b6c9256" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Eastern_State_Penitentiary_Protest.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The prison is finally closed in January, 1970, having served almost 141 years. While still seeing occasional use by the city, it remained largely abandoned until restoration work began in 1991.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By 1994, Eastern State Penitentiary reopened its doors, this time to tourists, playing host to over 10,000 tourists the first year. Over the years, up to the present day, thanks to generous donations, volunteers, and a steady stream of fascinated tourists, Eastern State Penitentiary continues its slow recovery.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 2008, we arrived on a warm summer day. It's a museum, of course, and I tend to be anti-museum. At least in so far as museums are traditionally done. This is almost an un-museum.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Much of it is in its original state. Parts have been restored, but much of it is exactly as they found it after its period of abandonment. That appeals to me. The only work they're doing on those parts appears to be stabilization to keep the place from falling down.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Old cell." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="19c6ad58-1f92-414c-996e-a73501783af3" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_6530_1.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">As a result, you get a feeling for it that goes beyond anything a pristine museum could give you. The self-guided tour, using headphones with prerecorded messages, allows your view to be interrupted as little as possible with silly signs and displays. Very little takes away from the experience.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">My only negative comment about the place would be that part of it was kept off limits for special members, at least at the time I was there.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=274&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="AWbYustq-ktQt9yLUcKldSoJV0aRRgvTUGVBeUd2j2k"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 21 Jul 2008 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 274 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_ESP#comments Camp Bison https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Burwash <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Camp Bison</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 06/10/2007 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Once a low-security work farm for prisoners, this prison supported an entire town for many years. Houses from the town were either torn down, or sold and moved to other places. The main prison building, and many of its supporting buildings, was also torn down. The only remnants, aside from the outline of streets, sidewalks, and disconnected power poles, is Camp Bison pictured here.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Burwash facility was originally constructed around 1914 and closed in 1974. It housed from 180 to 820 inmates at a time over its history. Camp Bison itself was opened in 1960.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Some additional information available at <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burwash,_Ontario" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The first time I visited this location, I had no idea where I was going. I had heard reference to it online, but was only able to find a picture of a hand-drawn map (on a napkin, no less) indicating where Camp Bison was.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">After a couple of wrong turns, I finally located the correct road and went as far as I could. The rest was a walk that would take about an hour and included railway tracks, a creek to be crossed balancing on a narrow pole, and an ever-growing swamp that seems intent on blocking passage to the old building.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When the hour of walking was nearly complete, and I still wasn't 100% sure I was even on the right road, I rounded a corner and was greeted with the sight of two smaller buildings and then, across an open field, stood the very place I sought.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><b>Update May 17, 2009</b> - I managed to obtain a copy of a Land Use Study conducted by the Province of Ontario. The report is dated October, 1978, just four years after the prison's closure.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">There are several things noted within the report, that I felt would be of interest.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>Page 9</b> - <i>The institutional facilities (cell blocks, classrooms, workshops, laundry, chapel, gymnasium) at Main Camp and Camp Bison have not been used since the Correctional Centre closed in 1974. The Federal Government, however, is committed to using the main building at Camp Bison as part of the maximum security prison, and is interested in using the institutional buildings and barns at Main Camp for the minimum security prison farm.</i></p> <p class="text-align-justify">It would be interesting to know what happened to cause this maximum security penitentiary not to be built here. Perhaps later research will bring that to light.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>Page 9-10</b> - <i>There are approximately 95 residential units at Burwash, concentrated at Main Camp and along one road adjacent to the CNR line. Those units consist of:</i></p> <ul><li class="text-align-justify"><i>51 single-family detached houses</i></li> <li class="text-align-justify"><i>12 semi-detached houses</i></li> <li class="text-align-justify"><i>28 apartments</i></li> <li class="text-align-justify"><i>4 row houses</i></li> </ul><p class="text-align-justify"><i>In addition, there is a dormitory adjacent to Neilly Lake in the Main Camp which can accommodate 38 persons.</i></p> <p class="text-align-justify"><i>At present, only 7 residential units are occupied, resulting in a permanent population at Burwash of 22 persons.</i></p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>Page 11</b> - <i>Burwash receives mail through a post office in the Main Camp. Fire protection is currently provided by a volunteer fire brigade staffed by the Ministry of Government Services. The Ontario Provincial smurfs detachment (30-35 men) provides smurfs protection to the site.</i></p> <p class="text-align-justify"><i>The 10 school age children residing at Burwash are bussed to public and separate schools in the City of Sudbury.</i></p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>Page 14</b> - <i>The following three commitments have been made on future uses of the site:</i></p> <ol><li class="text-align-justify"><i>Camp Bison Federal Penitentiary - maximum security prison for approximately 145 inmates and 210 staff, the first phase of which is to be operational by April, 1979.</i></li> <li class="text-align-justify"><i>Truck Inspection Station - Administration building and weigh scale to be constructed by the Ministry of Transportation and Communications on a small site on the west side of Highway 69, approximately 300 metres north of the Main Gate at Burwash.</i></li> <li class="text-align-justify"><i>Snowmobile Trail</i> <ul><li><i>narrow right-of-way on the west side of the Wanapitei River, running southward from Millard Lake to the south-west corner of the site;</i></li> <li><i>the trail which is being developed by the Broder-Dill Snowmobilers' Association and Killarney Snowmobile Club will provide a continuous snowmobile route from Sudbury to the Village of Killarney on north Georgian Bay;</i></li> <li><i>the trail has the support of the Ministry of Natural Resources.</i></li> </ul></li> </ol><p class="text-align-justify">The inspection station was created. Sort of. There are two paved areas on either side of Highway 69 where, from time to time, inspections are carried out. There is, however, no permanent building at this station.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Certainly snowmobile activity in the Burwash area is substantial. I'm not sure if it was ever formalized into a proper trail.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Most glaringly, however, Camp Bison Federal Penitentiary certainly never happened.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>NOTE:</b> This is private property.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uEnHlWqkADk?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8ATMSB7VsGU?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=172&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="Ra3TYkhWDUANfPvz3otQt9UeaL37Xz0KTAG2kXQrqfM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 10 Jun 2007 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 172 at https://urbexobsession.com https://urbexobsession.com/gallery_Burwash#comments