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Kingston Penitentiary

We arrived on a bright and sunny May morning, parked and proceeded to the front entrance to begin our tour.  My attention was initially distracted by the person positioned there to check me in and give me instructions before I noticed the sheer magnitude and domination of this entrance.  Of course, that was its design...  Instant intimidation of anyone entering through the massive doors.

SS Norisle

On July 15, 1946, the 215-foot SS Norisle, hull #136, was launched at the Collingwood Shipyards and was put into service as a ferry on October 17 of that year. It was operated by the Owen Sound Transportation Company and ran between Tobermory and South Baymouth, Manitoulin Island. With a single 1,000 hp coal-fire steam engine and a gross tonnage of 1,668, the Norisle had a speed of 12 kts (22 km/h), and a capacity of 200 passengers and 50 vehicles. She was 203 feet in length, 36 feet across the beam, and had a 16 foot draught.

George's Island

History: 

Originally named Ile a la Raquette (Snowshoe Island), this island located in Halifax harbour was renamed George Island in 1749 after King George II. From the mid-18th century until after World War II, it played a part in the defense of Halifax.

During the 1750's, the island served as a prison of Acadians during the Great Upheaval.

Rockwood Asylum for the Criminally Insane

History: 

Construction of Rockwood Asylum began in 1859 to house the "criminally insane" of Kingston Penitentiary. The asylum's site overlooking Lake Ontario was thought to have a calming effect on patients. The new limestone edifice - still situated near here - began accepting non-criminal patients in 1868. Rockwood became part of the Ontario provincial asylum system in 1877.

William Birch Rankine Generating Station

History: 

After some slowdowns, minor construction began April 30, 1897. This wasn't a serious attempt at construction, but rather just enough to satisfy certain contractual obligations.

Many legal battles and negotiations ensued, and real construction on the site did not begin until May 23, 1901, just over four years later. On January 2, 1905, the station formally opened with two operational 10,000 HP generators producing about 17,000 kilowatts.